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Connecticut adds Delaware, Oklahoma, Kansas to travel advisory, bringing list to 19 states

Gov. Ned Lamont visited Bradley International Airport to speak about Connecticut's new self-quarantine protocols for travelers from high-infection states.
Gov. Ned Lamont visited Bradley International Airport to speak about Connecticut's new self-quarantine protocols for travelers from high-infection states. (Eliza Fawcett)

Connecticut added Delaware, Kansas and Oklahoma to its COVID-19 travel advisory list Tuesday, making 19 states in total from which travelers are asked to self-quarantine upon arrival.

The full list includes:

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  • Alabama
  • Arkansas
  • Arizona
  • California
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Iowa
  • Idaho
  • Kansas
  • Louisiana
  • Mississippi
  • North Carolina
  • Nevada
  • Oklahoma
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah

Travelers from those states are now asked to self-quarantine for a 14-day period from the time of last contact within the identified state.

The list, established in conjunction with New York and New Jersey, includes all states with a new daily positive test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents or with a 10% or higher positivity rate over a 7-day rolling average. The travel advisory list began last month with eight states, then expanded to 16 and now 19.

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So far, the quarantine requirement has not been meaningfully enforced. Lamont has said he would consider following New York in fining violators in the future but did not think that was currently necessary.

As Connecticut’s COVID-19 numbers have decreased over the past few weeks, other states have seen surges, leading to record caseloads across the nation. Public health experts in Connecticut have expressed concern that the state’s progress could reverse itself quickly if out-of-state travelers import the disease in large numbers.

“There are a lot of forces moving against us,” Dr. David Banach, epidemiologist at UConn Health, said in late June. “Notably what’s happening throughout the country and that travel is inevitable and that we’re going to be having people that are traveling to other areas where there are higher rates.”

Alex Putterman can be reached at aputterman@courant.com.

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