Bill tracker: Where do key issues stand in the Connecticut legislature?

Bill tracker: Where do key issues stand in the Connecticut legislature?
Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy delivers his budget address to the senate and house inside the Hall of the House at the State Capitol, Wednesday. (Jessica Hill, Associated Press)

Stay up to date on the important issues facing Connecticut including debates over tolls, marijuana and the minimum wage by following The Courant’s bill tracker.

Plastic bags, seat belts, satellite dishes and a bear hunt: Connecticut legislators consider myriad new laws.

Check back throughout the legislative session to see how far along bills are in the process.

  • Marijuana

Legalizing recreational use of marijuana

A detailed marijuana legalization bill has the backing of more than 40 House Democrats. It calls for recreational sales to begin at the state's medical marijuana dispensaries and mentions taxing sales but does not include a specific rate.

What's Next: Awaiting action in the finance committee.

Status: Proposed

  • Tolls

Placing electronic tolls on Connecticut highways

The first tolls bill of the legislative session was introduced by state Sen. Alexandra Bergstein, D-Greenwich. The proposal, which still needs to be fleshed out, calls for toll rates to be similar to surrounding states and part of the money raised to be set aside for a new stateinfrastructure bank.

What's Next: Awaiting action in the transportation committee.

Status: Proposed

  • Wages

Raising the minimum wage above current levels

An early proposal would increase Connecticut's minimum wage from $10.10 an hour to $15 an hour by the beginning of 2023. The increase would be phased in gradually, something Gov. Ned Lamont has said is important so businesses can adjust. After 2023 the minimum wage would be tied to inflation.

What's Next: Awaiting action in the labor committee.

Status: Proposed

  • Betting

Legalizing sports betting online and in casinos

A bipartisan bill from lawmakers in southeastern Connecticut would authorize sports betting and give the state's two tribal casinos first dibs at launching the new form of gambling. Nearby states including Rhode Island already have sports betting programs up and running.

What's Next: Awaiting action in the public safety committee.

Status: Proposed

  • Leave

Programs for paid family and medical leave

Several paid leave bills have been submitted and the issue is a priority for legislative leaders as well as Gov. Ned Lamont. No specifics have been introduced yet, but past paid leave programs have been derailed because of startup costs in the tens of millions of dollars.

What's Next: Awaiting action in the labor committee.

Status: Proposed

  • Vaping

Limiting sale of electronic cigarettes to teens

Looking to stem the increase in teen vaping, lawmakers have introduced proposals to tax e-cigarettes as well as raising the age to purchase the products from 18 to 21.

What's Next: Awaiting action in the public health committee.

Status: Proposed

  • Plastic Bags

Ban on single-use plastic bags

With several towns in Connecticut already banning them, several legislators are calling for a statewide ban on single-use plastic bags. California was the first state to ban the bags, beginning in July 2015. A proposal last year to impose a five-cent tax on plastic shopping bags passed at the committee level but was not taken up in the House or Senate.

What's Next: Awaiting action in the environment committee.

Status: Proposed

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